That DAM Project

The Denver Art Museum (DAM) has an encyclopedic collection of over 70,000 artworks, spanning centuries and the entire globe, over 400 of which fall into the fairly broad category of “electronic media” (video and software-based installations, CD-ROMs, websites, video tapes, and more). Due to the exhibition and acquisition of electronic media art and time-based media art often out pacing the development of best practices for the preservation of such artworks, the Denver Art Museum, like many museums, has developed a “backlog” of untreated and minimally cataloged objects necessary for the realization of the museum's media artwork collection. To combat this backlog, the museum has adopted an iterative, project-based approach to identification and treatment of such objects. I had the pleasure of taking a leading role in the most recent project at the DAM, an IMLS grant-funded initiative aimed at migrating all of the media artwork in the collection to a digital repository, and updating all catalog records for each object, either physical or digital, associated with those works.

Read More

Buky Schwartz: Re-constructions

I recently completed my MA degree thesis project on the conceptual artist Buky Schwartz. Schwartz is perhaps best known for the video installations and single-channel video art that he created during the 1970s and 1980s. His estate's collection of photographs, video tapes, and other forms of documentation embody the artist's legacy as well as the key to preserving his artwork. 

Read More

Video Artist Paul Ryan's Archive

Paul Ryan was a pioneer of his field and can be considered one of the first video artists. The collection of Paul Ryan is now housed in an apartment on the Upper West Side of Manhattan where Ryan lived and worked for much of his career. The following Collection Assessment describes the significance, organization, and condition of the Ryan's analog video collection.

Read More

TechFocus iii

“TechFocus iii: Caring for Software-based Art,” a symposium organized by the American Institute for Conservation’s Electronic Media Group, sought to address the difficult task of preserving works created in a constantly evolving medium. Hosted by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the symposium brought together leaders in the field of software-preservation from a variety of cultural institutions to share case studies, provide workshops, and to further develop a network of collection caretakers. The complexities of software-based artworks are immense, and a community of collection professionals (formed through events like these) is essential to providing future access and exhibition of such works.

Read More

New (+Old) Media: Restoration, Preservation, Archiving and Access

I had the good fortune to attend the New (+Old) Media: Restoration, Preservation, Archiving and Access Meeting and Symposium this summer, from June 25-27. Richard Lowenberg of the 1st-Mile Institute (http://www.1st-mile.org/) organized the meeting as part of the 2015 CURRENTS: Santa Fe International New Media Festival (http://currentsnewmedia.org/).

Read More